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#1

The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:55 pm
by Greasy Paws | 111 Posts

The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree.
The FBI for more than a decade has issued choice of Glock 22 (shown) or Glock 23 to new agents.


By Massad Ayoob

The Glock pistol has profoundly changed the handgun industry, creating a new generation of polymer-frame pistols, not to mention semiautomatics with uniform trigger pulls from the first shot, but usually without manual safety devices. Exquisitely light and ergonomic, easy to handle and easy to shoot well, the Glock pistols have boldly carved their own very large niche in the history of handgunning.

Pedigree

The Glock has been well received by the experts. “All in all, this Glock 17 has to be rated the number-one military handgun today,” says Timothy Mullin. “It is rapidly stripped, efficient to manufacture, low in cost, holds 17 rounds, has light recoil, and has an ideal safety system. The more you shoot it, the more you like it.”


Author’s factory cutaway G17 shows signature Glock trigger safety and standard firing pin spring… intentional pull of the trigger will depress trigger safety, and pull will move trigger bar ...

...simultaneously pushing firing pin safety out of the way of the partially pre-cocked striker.
In the second edition of the Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery, Chuck Karwan wrote, “Though the Glock is technically a double-action-only pistol…the trigger pull does not feel like that of a double-action. For some agencies and people – including yours truly – that is the charm of the Glock. It offers the simplicity advantage of a DAO system with a crisp, easy-to-control sear release that feels like a good single-action trigger pull."

When Chuck Taylor wrote the fourth edition of that title, he commented, “The Glock is perhaps the only truly revolutionary pistol design to surface since the first two decades of this century and reflects great engineering skill. It’s simple, easy to disassemble and maintain, accurate and rugged almost beyond belief. In fact, I’ve been trying to wear one out for over five years without success. So far, my Model 17 9mm has ingested more than 125,000 rounds of full-power ammunition and is still going strong. During the course of the test, the gun has been presented from a holster over 500,000 times, speed and tactical reloaded in excess of 100,000 times, and carried all over the world in virtually every natural environment possible. Yet it has continued to function without so much as a hiccup. In my experience, no other handgun – even the legendary Colt M1911 .45 ACP – can approach, much less duplicate or exceed, this performance.”

Taylor concludes, “The plain facts indicate the Glock is quite safe and easy to shoot, and needs little to achieve its maximum potential. It’s also tough, accurate, and utterly dependable. In my opinion, this is the best combat pistol in the world today and well worth your consideration.”


More than the experts, however, threw in their lot with the Pre-eminent Polymer Pistol.

The rank and file went to the gun in a big way. It is issued by more police departments than any other, overwhelmingly leading in sales to law enforcement agencies with a market share claimed to be over 70%.

In 1990, the FBI said that it would not approve the Glock because its short, easy trigger pull for the first shot was incompatible with their training.

A decade later, the Bureau was issuing a new Glock .40 to every recruit and authorizing a broad array of Glocks for purchase by in-service agents.

The Glock may be the most publicly controversial pistol of our time. It tends to inspire either love or hate, with little ground in between, and most assuredly, not everyone loves the Glock.

Traditionalists who cleave to blue steel and checkered walnut consider the Glock anathema. Aesthetes find it ugly. Yet the Glock has inspired truly awesome levels of brand loyalty.

Gaston Glock had a factory in Austria where he successfully fabricated an assortment of objects from high-strength, high-impact polymer. When he was approached by firearms manufacturers about producing experimental frames for handguns, it occurred to him that a whole pistol couldn’t be that hard to make. He led his engineers on a crash program that began with the proverbial new sheet of paper, and he unleashed the result on the firearms world in 1984.

With about the grip angle of a Luger, the low bore axis of an HK P7, and its own unique takedown system, the polymer-framed pistol was his seventeenth design and he therefore dubbed it the Glock 17. Mullin sums up best what happened next: “The Glock 17 was first adopted by the Austrian army, then by the Swedish and Norwegian armies, and now has spread throughout the world."

The City of Miami Police Department was not the first American police department to adopt the Glock, but it was the highest profile one to do so to that point. A few years before, the city had ordered all its service revolvers altered to double action only after Janet Reno’s State’s Attorney’s Office had prosecuted a Miami cop for manslaughter on the bogus theory that he had cocked the revolver and accidentally discharged it, killing a suspect.

In fact, famed defense attorneys Roy Black and Mark Seiden proved to the jury that Officer Luis Alvarez had fired the single shot double action and intentionally when the suspect, Nevell “Snake” Johnson, went for his own gun while being arrested, and the jury acquitted the cop. However, “the perception was taken as reality.”


Standard frame Glocks have been produced in these five sizes. From top, 6-inch longslide (G17L), 5.3-inch Tactical/Practical (G34), 4.5-inch full size (G17), 4.0-inch Compact (G19), 3.5-inch subcompact (G26). All shown are 9mm; .40s are identical in size.


Meanwhile, cops across the country were pleading with their chiefs to issue them high capacity 9mm auto pistols to replace their six-shot revolvers and give them parity with street criminals who could carry whatever illegally-obtained guns they wished. Miami’s finest were no different. The chief told them, sure, they could have 9mm autos – if the guns were double action only.

This was a little like telling your employees they can have a raise when horses grow wings and fly. Members of the union approached Beretta, SIG, and S&W, who told them that double action only autos were illogical and wouldn’t be profitable to make.
And then, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms officially declared the Glock pistol to be double action only.

The undoubtedly exasperated chief was stuck with his promise, and after a torture test of monumental proportions, which the Glock 17 passed with flying colors, it became the standard issue firearm for Miami PD. Other departments followed, and Glock sales skyrocketed. Police firearms instructors reported with delight that the cops were scoring better than ever in department qualifications, because the Glocks were so easy to learn to shoot well.

Glock soon established a US headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia. In charge was Carl Walter, who brilliantly established a roving program that trained Glock instructors and armorers whenever a department adopted the guns.

The polymer construction and modern manufacturing concepts adopted by Gaston Glock allowed the brand to undersell the traditional double actions by Beretta, SIG, and S&W, who only now got with the program and offered double action only autos. However, their guns were still heavier, and still had longer, heavier trigger pulls that made them harder to shoot straight with limited practice.

To send an officer to Smith & Wesson armorer’s school, the department had to pay his salary for the duration of the five-day course; by contrast, Glock armorer’s school lasted all of one day.


"My ardent desire is, and my aim has been ... to comply strictly with all our engagements foreign and domestic; but to keep the United States free from political connections with every other country. To see that they may be independent of all, and under the influence of none. In a word, I want an American character, that the powers of Europe may be convinced we act for ourselves and not for others; this, in my judgment, is the only way to be respected abroad and happy at home." --George Washington, letter to Partick Henry, 1775

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#2

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Sun Jan 09, 2011 10:13 am
by LLE | 101 Posts

Thanks to GP for these articles. I love my G23, and would not be without it, but I would never try to convince anyone to love a Glock. I could never understand why so many refer to Glocks as "ugly", but I would never try to convince someone that they are beautiful. My guess is that a majority of those who badmouth Glocks have never even tried one, or if they have tried one[assuming the weapon fits properly], I have yet to hear a reasoned, objective exposition of how it compared unfavorably with their favorite----and I always wonder why.

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#3

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Sun Jan 09, 2011 10:32 am
by Vaquero | 156 Posts

I have been considering a 17 for a while now. Nice article.


no fear, no doubt, all in, balls out!

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#4

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:09 pm
by Larry W | 158 Posts

Let me share some stuff with ya-all, OK, where's it at?? Vaq!! Did you take the soap box?? LOL.
I really don't have experience with the Glocks, except for shooting various pistols belonging to someone else,
I could not even tell you the models, Mostly 9mm. But what I do have experience in, is my oldest brother, & his use & abuse (lot's of abuse) of a G17. My brother lives in the hills of West Virginia, 30 minutes east of Morgantown & WVU. were talking sticks, outback, Jed Clampett Ville??
He works a lot in the woods, & his large Garden Etc Etc. I have seen with my own eyes, his 17 lost while on a tractor, disking a field, Almost 3 months & a ton of dirt, rain & mud later, it was found. I was standing right there, the thing looked "Dead" Done over with!!! He made sure the tube was not clogged, DID NOT EVEN DROP THE MAG" & preceded to run off the full load, without even a hitch??? Yes I have seen the videos of Glock torture test's, So has my brother. After the burred in the field deal, he decided to do his own torture test, & torture he did!! Toss it in the creek & leave it for???? Throw it around, bounce it off of a tree, toss it out in the woods & leave it in the snow, fire the hell out of it & never clean it??? Well I have seen it with my own eyes, This thing NEVER failed to go bang, & NEVER had a hick-up of any kind!!! No, I am not trying to make Glock's out to be the quint essential, end all, be all, Super man wonder gun that will make you shoot lightening bolts out of your ass.
But no matter how he / we tried, that pistol always went bang. I have heard similar stories from other Glock owners. That coupled with actually seeing a torture test, is why a Glock is on my "Next to get List".


Larry

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#5

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 3:07 pm
by LLE | 101 Posts

Larry; Two years ago, when I attended the 4 day defensive handgun course at Front Sight, one of my class instructors [ not affiliated with Glock] allowed any class member, who wanted to, to fire his Glock 17. After they were all finished, he told them the "story". They had just fired a G17 that had passed 35,000 rounds WITHOUT being cleaned or maintained in any way. No one believed him, until he offered a school record certification as to the facts [and the school had no affiliation with Glock, also, but I bet you can guess what their rentals were].

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#6

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:09 pm
by luckybychoice | 55 Posts

I can say that i love shooting my Glocks,this is a real good article,i had read it once before somewhere,i'm a fan of Massad Ayoob too,he writes very well i think.And GP sent that in? bet that kinda hurt GP,lmao! Now i really want a 1911 .45 to go with my others too,just to fool around with.


trample the weak,hurdle the dead

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#7

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:26 pm
by Greasy Paws | 111 Posts

I am not a fan of Glocks personally.I also recognize that they are popular with most people here so I posted both parts fo this article.Massad is an excellent writer who doesnt use a telescopically sighted typewriter to write about guns.He puts lead down range.


"My ardent desire is, and my aim has been ... to comply strictly with all our engagements foreign and domestic; but to keep the United States free from political connections with every other country. To see that they may be independent of all, and under the influence of none. In a word, I want an American character, that the powers of Europe may be convinced we act for ourselves and not for others; this, in my judgment, is the only way to be respected abroad and happy at home." --George Washington, letter to Partick Henry, 1775

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#8

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:37 pm
by Vaquero | 156 Posts

I figure the G17 is on my short list for multiple reasons.
Most common ammo.
Most common magazine.
Most common platform.
Most reliable.
I'm busy, I have ultra limited time to gain proficiency with another handgun. I need to make it count as much as possible. G17 it is.
Anybody want to sell me one?


no fear, no doubt, all in, balls out!

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#9

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 9:41 pm
by luckybychoice | 55 Posts

used Police trade ins usually less than 400.oo,when you want to get one i'm sure we can find ya a good one,most police trade ins are carried a lot and shot a little.


trample the weak,hurdle the dead

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#10

RE: The Glock Pistol Part II - A Fantastic, Plastic Pedigree

in Gun Discussion Mon Jan 10, 2011 9:49 pm
by Greasy Paws | 111 Posts

one o these days I may try owning a glock but I will have one in .45 ACP thank you.Or even 10mm.For 9mm I will stick to the CZ75.Oh hell,but I do want a Browning Hi Power...


"My ardent desire is, and my aim has been ... to comply strictly with all our engagements foreign and domestic; but to keep the United States free from political connections with every other country. To see that they may be independent of all, and under the influence of none. In a word, I want an American character, that the powers of Europe may be convinced we act for ourselves and not for others; this, in my judgment, is the only way to be respected abroad and happy at home." --George Washington, letter to Partick Henry, 1775

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